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I’d like to talk briefly about Calvinball. Calvinball (of Calvin and Hobbes fame) has no set rules, except that you can’t use the same rule twice. It’s chaos, yet it seems to make sense. For those unacquainted with the venerable sport, an example of Calvinball can be found here. Today’s post has a certain Calvinball flavor. I couldn’t find a principle that illustrates the point I’d like to make, so I created one based on my experience in educational design: The 10/5 Rule of CLE. Simply put, The 10/5 Rule of CLE says that a CLE presenter should speak…
I recently attended my first Association for Continuing Legal Education (ACLEA) conference right here in Chicago.   A recurring theme I heard was how to enhance legal education to change the hearts and minds of lawyers who view CLE as a time suck. If my two decades of teaching and facilitating has taught me anything, it’s that if your audience comes into the room thinking “I have a million things to do,” then the phrase “tough crowd” doesn’t even begin to describe the experience you’re going to have.   It’s at this point that the CLE-as-a-time-suck conversation often goes a little quiet; there are a few subtle nods of agreement and someone may even cough. However,…
Last month, I was fortunate enough to be involved in the Illinois Supreme Court Commission on Professionalism’s (Commission) Future is Now: Legal Services 2.019 conference in Chicago (shameless plug – save the date for April 2020). The conference got me thinking about the nature of conferences, talks, the legal learning space and how they interact with the theories of learning architecture. Attorneys are some of the most adept people when it comes to absorbing and recalling large amounts of detailed information. However, even they have limits of what they can effectively take in, and lengthy lectures can be challenging…