Coronavirus

Over the last few months, the lockdown and the slow reopening caused by the COVID-19 pandemic forced many families to spend countless days and weeks in close proximity to one another. In many cases, the extra family time has been a blessing. In others, the time together served as a notice that the family home is starting to feel a bit small—or perhaps a little too big. If you are in the latter group, you may be thinking that it is time to start looking for your next home. Or, maybe you were already in the market for a…
Synopsis: Must Read for All IL Staffing Companies!! Ottawa Appellate Court Dramatically Changes Liability/WC Law for IL Staffing Industry. Research and Analysis by Lindsay Vanderford, J.D. Editor’s Comment: In a split 2-1 Decision, the 3d District Appellate Court decided an appeal from the Circuit Court’s grant of dismissal of a common law or general liability lawsuit in favor of a worker attempting to sidestep the plain meaning of the IL WC Act in Jaime Quintana v. Ferrara Candy Company, Appeal No. 3-19-0414, Circuit No. 17-L-890. In a split decision, the Third District Illinois appeals panel comprised of Justices McDade, Wright,…
We advised our readers previously that they could participate “live” in the taping of Quorum Forum Episode 42: Sunshine Laws. For those of you who could not be there, you can now listen to the new episode here. A summary of the episode is below: We’re celebrating summertime on Ancel Glink’s Quorum Forum podcast talking about sunshine laws with Eugene Bolotnikov, including the latest guidance from the Public Access Counselor on the Open Meetings Act and Freedom of Information Act during the COVID-19 pandemic. Then, Catie Coghlan reviews how the State of Illinois and large counties are distributing CARES Act…
Thinking about divorce is common.  Every married person has thought about divorce. Most married people have researched divorce (and stumbled on sites like this). But when it comes to filing for divorce, people are hesitant.  Even if a person is ready to file for divorce, when is the best time to file for divorce?  In Illinois, there are a few timing considerations when deciding when to file for a divorce. Does It Matter Who Files First In An Illinois Divorce? There is no grand strategic advantage to filing for divorce before the other person files. The person who files first…
Our Lawyer Spotlight series highlights Illinois lawyers who are demonstrating the ideals of professionalism in their daily lives. These attorneys are teaching us how to adapt and thrive in the changing legal environment. Catherine Cornell is an attorney at The Veterans Practice, Ltd., where she handles VA disability compensation appeals for veterans. She also helps survivors of veterans obtain benefits if they are denied. Catherine practices at the administrative levels of appeal up to the Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims. How is The Veterans Practice adapting to the changing work environment? It’s amazing how little has changed in my…
Forty percent of counties and county-equivalents in the U.S. have less than one lawyer per 1,000 residents, according to the American Bar Association’s 2020 Profile of the Legal Profession. The second edition of the profile also reported continuing racial equity and law school debt challenges, which have the potential to be exacerbated by COVID-19. The ABA’s Profile of the Legal Profession is a compilation of the latest statistics in the legal profession. Two new sections were created specifically for 2020: a statistical look at legal deserts and a survey of how law school debt is impacting the lives of…
On March 20, 2020, Governor J.B. Pritzker issued a statewide shelter-in-place order. The order was intended to slow the spread of COVID-19 and keep people safe in their own homes. Although the order may have saved lives and helped Illinois flatten the curve, for others, the news was not good. These are the individuals that are victims of domestic violence. For many of these victims, the only relief they had from the threat of abuse prior to the pandemic was when they went to work, or when their abuser did. It was not long before Chicago, and many other…
Meadowbrook Manor Reports Another COVID-19 Death, Highest Case Rate in Will County The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) reports another COVID-19 death at Meadowbrook Manor in Bolingbrook in Will County. The facility has been home to 41 deaths since the start of the pandemic, with the majority related to an outbreak in May. This is the first death noted since May 29th. The facility has the highest number of deaths in Illinois among any other long-term care facility. Continue reading ›
We’re celebrating summertime on Ancel Glink’s Quorum Forum podcast talking about sunshine laws with Eugene Bolotnikov, including the latest guidance from the Public Access Counselor on the Open Meetings Act and Freedom of Information Act during the COVID-19 pandemic. Then, Catie Coghlan reviews how the State of Illinois and large counties are distributing CARES Act Coronavirus Relief Funds to local governments. How have your local government meetings changed during the pandemic? Email us at podcast@ancelglink.com! Watch the podcast at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FlUnJjNRMQQ. ​— Resources—Municipal Minute, Updated PAC Guidance on OMA and FOIA During the COVID-19 Pandemic http://municipalminute.ancelglink.com/2020/07/updated-pac-guidance-on-oma-and-foia.html Municipal Minute, Court Rejects Bad Faith Claims…
As we have reported in the past, there have been a number of lawsuits filed against the Illinois Governor challenging his authority to impose restrictions on various activities and businesses to address the COVID-19 pandemic. One of these lawsuits was one brought by the Village of Orland Park, an Orland Park business, and individuals in Village of Orland Park v. Pritzker seeking emergency injunctive relief to stop the Governor from enforcing various executive orders restricting activities and businesses. A federal district court judge recently issued a ruling in that case denying the Village and other plaintiffs injunctive relief and  in…
There is no right or wrong answer when deciding whether your children should attend school in-person full time, under a hybrid model or 100% remotely. Every family has to make a choice based on the best interests of their children and loved ones.    In families that are separated or divorced, this decision becomes even more difficult. In many situations, one parent has the majority of parenting time. With remote or hybrid learning, this places not only the vast majority of responsibility on that parent to facilitate e-learning, but in many circumstances, also the need for daytime childcare when schoolwork has been completed. For working parents or parents with multiple children, it can be a nearly impossible to do this while also meeting work and job…
One of the most important considerations in a divorce or any co-parenting situation is making sure that children are well provided for by both parents. Whether you are the custodial or non-custodial parent, you bear the responsibility to contribute financially to your children’s food, clothing, shelter, health, and education. However, as your financial situation changes, especially during the uncertain times of the COVID-19 pandemic, you may find it difficult to keep up with the payments in your original child support order. If you have recently been laid off or have experienced an involuntary drop in income, you should consider pursuing…
Contributed by Suzanne Newcomb, August 5, 2020 As our readers know, the Families First Coronavirus Relief Act (FFCRA) requires employers with less than 500 employees to provide paid leave to employees who are unable to work (or telework) for a variety of COVID-related reasons (including caring for children not in school due to COVID) though December 31, 2020. On April 6, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) issued a final rule implementing the FFCRA. Shortly thereafter, the State of New York filed suit claiming the regulations unduly restrict employees’ right to paid leave. This week a federal judge in…
Earlier this week, a federal court in New York kicked to the curb four key provisions of the U.S. Department of Labor’s regulation implementing the paid leave provisions of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, requiring employers covered by the Act to quickly decide how it will address these scenarios in the future. As you will recall, the DOL issued final FFCRA regulations on leave on April 1, 2020 as a sweet little April fool’s present for us. Days later, the State of New York sued the DOL, claiming that the agency  unlawfully denied leave to otherwise eligible employees and…
In this episode of Reimagining Law, we talk to Y’Noka Bass, a rising 3L at Loyola University Chicago School of Law, and Rummana Alam, a Teaching Assistant Professor at the University of Illinois College of Law. Y’Noka and Rummana discuss the importance of diversity in law schools, initiatives in Illinois law schools that support diversity, and how law schools can better support people of color. Subscribe to our channel to stay up to date on new episodes of Reimagining Law! Timestamps 1:18 – Why is diversity important in the law school setting? 2:32 – How can law schools better support…
An appellate court recent ruled in favor of a public body in a FOIA challenge in Sherrod v. City of Kankakee, 2020 IL App (3d) 190374-U.  In 2016, an inmate (plaintiff) filed two FOIA requests with the City of Kankakee for records regarding the murder of a specific individual. After the City conducted a reasonably diligent search for records responsive to the request, the City provided responsive records in the City’s possession and custody, while denying portions of both requests for records the City was unable to locate during their searches. After the plaintiff filed a request for review with…